So this is Christmas

The day after Christmas, when everything becomes relatively normal again, reminds me of this title from John Lennon. In the past, I have been in the place of work, a home for the elderly and sick, over the Christmas period. I held meetings, we sang the old songs, and read the texts connected to Christmas. This time it was different and we stayed at home. I needed time to get over the things that contributed to my condition and start anew. It is sometimes very difficult for people to understand, which I can understand.

From a distance, Christmas isn’t that impressive. That explains why people in other cultures don’t feel that they are missing much. In fact, it became very clear to me that unless you are immersed in some tradition, it doesn’t occur to you that you’re missing out on something. However, outside of Christmas, I found that I was drifting without much connection to anything. I didn’t feel that I belonged anywhere, which is a strange feeling. We all need to belong somewhere, even to something that we have a critical attitude towards. In fact, the critical attitude means that you belong all the more because you wouldn’t be critical if it wasn’t somehow important.

I think that there are many people who think they are outside of something that they can’t help criticising, but they’re not. If you are really outside, you don’t care and therefore don’t criticise. Thinking about this, it appears to me that there are people who think they are outside of a tradition who are really inside, and people who think they are inside but are really outside. If you spend time and thought, then you are not outside. That may come as a surprise to some.